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UP Jail Warden India Art Culture Questions

1. In which of the following dialects
Kabir wrote ?
(1) Avadhi (2) Bhojpuri
(3) Brijbhasa (4) Maithili

2. Where is “Pushkar Fair” held ?
(1) Jodhpur (2) Ajmer
(3) Jaipur (4) Udaipur

3. Which of the following is called
the storehouse of world-art collections ?
(1) National Archives of India
(2) National Museum
(3) National Modren Art Gallery
(4) Salarjung Museum

4. Who introduced the famous Persian Festival of Nauroz ?
(1) Alauddin Khalji
(2) Iltutmish
(3) Firoz Tughlaq
(4) Balban

5. Which of the following is a famous
Assamese festival ?
(1) Makar Sakranti
(2) Yugadi
(3) Onam
(4) Rongali Bihu

6. Which language is spoken by the
people of Lakshadweep?
(1) Malayalam (2) Kannada
(3) Tamil (4) Telugu

7. In which State is the religious
festival ‘Ganesh Chaturthi’ Celebrated with gusto ?
(1) Rajasthan
(2) Gujarat
(3) Maharashtra
(4) Madhya Pradesh

 

8. Which of the following language
has been given the status of classical language by Central Government?
(1) Gujarati (2) Tamil
(3) Marathi (4) Malayalam

9. ‘Rath Yatra’ at Puri is celebrated
in honour of
(1) Lord Rama
(2) Lord Shiva
(3) Lord Jagannath
(4) Lord Vishnu

10. The most popular festival in Tamil
Nadu is :
(1) Gudipadwa (2) Onam
(3) Bihu (4) Pongal

Answers: 1. (2) 2. (1) 3. (2) 4. (2)
5. (2) 6. (2) 7. (3) 8. (1)
9. (2) 10. (1)

Explainations:

1. (1) Kabir, being illiterate, expressed his poems orally
in vernacular Hindi, borrowing from various dialects
including Avadhi, Braj, and Bhojpuri. His verses often
began with some strongly worded insult to get the
attention of passers-by. Kabir has enjoyed a revival of
popularity over the past half century as arguably the
most accessible and understandable of the Indian
saints, with a special influence over spiritual traditions
such as those of Sant Mat, Garib Das and Radha
Soami.

2. (2) The Pushkar Fair, or Pushkar ka Mela, is the annual
five-day camel and livestock fair, held in the town of
Pushkar in the state of Rajasthan, India. It is one of
the world’s largest camel fairs, and apart from buying
and selling of livestock it has become an important
tourist attraction and its highlights have become
competitions such as the “matka phod”, “longest
moustache”, and “bridal competition” are the main
draws for this fair which attracts thousands of tourists.
Pushkar is a town in the Ajmer district. Pushkar is
one of the oldest existing cities of India. It lies on the
shore of Pushkar Lake. The date of its actual origin is
not known, but legend associates Lord Brahma with
its creation.

3. (4) The Salar Jung Museum is an art museum located
at Darushifa, on the southern bank of the Musi River
in the city of Hyderabad. It is the third largest museum
in India housing the biggest one-man collections of
antiques in the world. It is well known throughout
India for its prized collections belonging to different
civilizations dating back to the 1st century. Nawab
Mir Yousuf Ali Khan Salar Jung III (1889–1949), former
Prime Minister of the seventh Nizam of Hyderabad,
spent a substantial amount of his income over thirty
five years to make this priceless collection, his life’s
passion.

4. (4) Balban’s conception of kingship was similar to that
of the theory of divine right of kings. He cast a halo of
superiority round monarchy. He introduced the system
of Nauroz to add to the dignity of his court.

5. (4) Bihu denotes a set of three different cultural festivals
of Assam. In a year there are three Bihu festivals in
Assam – in the months of Bohaag (Baisakh, the middle
of April), Maagh (the middle of January), and Kaati
(Kartik, the middle of October). The most important
and colourful of the three Bihu festival is the Spring
festival “Bohag Bihu” or Rongali Bihu celebrated in
the middle of April. This is also the beginning of the
agricultural season.

6. (1) The islanders are ethnically similar to the Malayali
people of the nearest Indian state of Kerala. Most of
the population speaks Malayalam with Mahi being the
most spoken language in Minicoy island.

7. (3) ‘Ganesha Chaturthi is the Hindu festival celebrated
on the birthday (rebirth) of Lord Ganesha, the son of
Shiva and Parvati. While celebrated all over India, it is
most elaborate in Maharashtra, Goa, Andhra Pradesh,
Karnataka, Orissa and Chhattisgarh.

8. (2) In 2004, the Government of India declared that
languages that met certain requirements could be
accorded the status of a “Classical Language in India”.
Languages so far declared to be Classical are Tamil
(in 2004), Sanskrit (in 2005), Kannada and Telugu (in
2008).

9. (3) Ratha Yatra is a huge Hindu festival associated
with Lord Jagannath held at Puri in the state of Odisha.
This annual festival is celebrated on Ashad Shukla
Dwitiya (second day in bright fortnight of Ashad
month).

10. (4) The festivals of Tamil Nadu are : Pongal, Jallikattu,
Chithirai and Adipperukku.

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BPSC World History Questions

1. When did China start the Civil Services Examinations ?
(1) 6 A.D (2) 1905
(3) 1920 (4) 1949

2. Who was the first Calipha
(1) Sulaiman, the Great
(2) Abu Bakr
(3) Iman Hussain
(4) Constantine

3. In which country is Karabla, the
holy city of Shia Muslims
located ?
(1) Iran (2) Iraq
(3) Jordan (4) Syria

4. The city of “Tashkent” is located in
(1) Uzbekistan (2) Kazakhstan
(3) Russia (4) Kyrgystan

5. Independence movement of Vietnam was headed by
(1) Ngo Dinh Diem
(2) Zhou Enlai
(3) Pol Pot
(4) Ho Chi Minh

6. Which one country is still governed by a monarch ?
(1) Afghanistan
(2) Iran
(3) Iraq
(4) Saudi Arabia

7. Japan’s Parliament is known as
(1) Diet (2) Dail
(3) Yuan (4) Shora

8. The currency of Thailand is
(1) Bhat (2) Rupiah
(3) Yuan (4) Yen

9. 1911 Revolution of China resulted
in
(1) Establishment of a Republic
(2) Reudalism
(3) Democracy
(4) Increased problems of people

10. East Timor, in Indonesian Archipelago, was the former colony of
(1) Dutch (2) English
(3) French (4) Portuguese

Ans: 1. (1) 2. (2) 3. (2) 4. (1)
5. (4) 6. (4) 7. (1) 8. (1)
9. (1) 10. (4)

Explainations

1. (1) One of the oldest examples of a civil service based
on meritocracy is the Imperial bureaucracy of China,
which can be traced as far back as the Qin Dynasty
(221–207 BC). During the Han Dynasty (202 BC–220
AD) the xiaolian system of recommendation by
superiors for appointments to office was established.
The civil service recruitment method and educational
system employed from the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–
A.D. 220) was abolished by the Ch’ing dowager
empress Tz’u Hsi in 1905 under pressure from leading
Chinese intellectuals. The Sui dynasty (581–618)
adopted this Han system and applied it in a much
more systematic way as a method of official
recruitment.

2. (2) Abu Bakr was a senior companion (Sahabi) and
the father-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.
He ruled over the Rashidun Caliphate from 632–634
CE when he became the first Muslim Caliph following
Muhammad’s death. As Caliph, Abu Bakr succeeded
to the political and administrative functions previously
exercised by Muhammad, since the religious function
and authority of prophethood ended with Muhammad’s
death according to Islam. He was called Al-Siddiq (The
Truthful).

3. (2) Karbala is a city in Iraq, southwest of Baghdad.
The city, best known as the location of the Battle of
Karbala (680), is amongst the holiest cities for Shia
Muslims after Mecca and Medina. It is home to the
Imam Hussein Shrine. Karbala is famous as the site
of the martyrdom of Hussein ibn Ali (Imam Hussein),
and commemorations are held by millions of Shias
annually to remember it. Karbala is considered sacred
by all Shias.

4. (1) Tashkent is the capital of Uzbekistan and of the
Tashkent Province. This historic city is associated
with the Tashkent Declaration of 10 January, 1966
which was a peace agreement between India and
Pakistan after the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965. The
Soviets, represented by Premier Alexei Kosygin
moderated between Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur
Shastri and Pakistani President Muhammad Ayub
Khan. The Tashkent conference, under UN, American
and Russian pressure, compelled Pakistan and India
to restore their national boundary and the 1949
ceasefire line in Kashmir. This eventually led to
dissatisfaction and protests against the Ayub Khan
leadership.

5. (4) Ho Chi Minh was a Vietnamese Communist dictator
who was prime minister (1945–1955) and president
(1945–1969) of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam
(North Vietnam). He was a key figure in the foundation
of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945, as
well as the People’s Army of Vietnam (PAVN) and the
Viet Cong (NLF or VC) during the Vietnam War. He
led the Viet Minh independence movement from 1941
onward, establishing the communist-ruled Democratic
Republic of Vietnam in 1945 and defeating the French
Union in 1954 at battle of Dien Bien Phu.

6. (4) Saudi Arabia, officially known as the Kingdom of
Saudi Arabia, is an absolute monarchy, although,
according to the Basic Law of Saudi Arabia adopted
by royal decree in 1992, the king must comply with
Sharia (that is, Islamic law) and the Quran. The Quran
and the Sunnah (the traditions of Muhammad) are
declared to be the country’s constitution, but no written
modern constitution has ever been written for Saudi
Arabia, and Saudi Arabia remains the only Arab Nation
where no national elections have ever taken place,
since its creation. No political parties or national
elections are permitted.

7. (1) The Diet is Japan’s bicameral legislature. It is
composed of a lower house, called the House of
Representatives, and an upper house, called the House
of Councillors. Both houses of the Diet are directly
elected under a parallel voting system. In addition to
passing laws, the Diet is formally responsible for
selecting the Prime Minister. The Diet was first
convened as the Imperial Diet in 1889 as a result of
adopting the Meiji constitution. The Diet took its
current form in 1947 upon the adoption of the postwar
constitution and is considered by the Constitution to
be the highest organ of state power.

8. (1) Baht is the currency of Thailand. It is subdivided
into 100 satang. The issuance of currency is the
responsibility of the Bank of Thailand.

9. (1) The Xinhai Revolution, also known as the
Revolution of 1911 or the Chinese Revolution,
overthrew China’s last imperial dynasty, the Qing
Dynasty, and established the Republic of China. The
revolution was named Xinhai because it occurred in
1911, the year of the Xinhai stem-branch in the
sexagenary cycle of the Chinese calendar. January 1,
1912, was set as the first day of the First Year of the
Republic of China.

10. (4) East Timor was colonized by Portugal in the 16th
century, and was known as Portuguese Timor until
Portugal’s decolonization of the country. In late 1975,
East Timor declared its independence, but later that
year was invaded and occupied by Indonesia and was
declared Indonesia’s 27th province the following year.
In 1999, following the United Nations-sponsored act
of self-determination, Indonesia relinquished control
of the territory and East Timor became the first new
sovereign state of the 21st century on May 20, 2002.

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HSSC Police Constable Ancient History Questions

1. Which among the following chronology is correct regarding four
‘samvatas’ ?
(1) Gupta–Gregorian–Hizri–Saka
(2) Gregorian–Saka–Hizri–Gupta
(3) Saka–Gregorian–Hizri–Gupta
(4) Hizri–Gupta–Gregorian–Saka

2. The home of Gargi, Maitrey, and
Kapila was at
(1) Vidisha (2) Ujjain
(3) Pataliputra (4) Mithila

3. Which area of India was known
as Avantika in ancient times ?
(1) Avadh (2) Ruhelkhand
(3) Bundelkhand (4) Malwa

4. The Social System of the Harappans was :
(1) Fairly egalitarian
(2) Slave-Labour based
(3) Colour (Varna) based
(4) Caste based

5. Which of the following Vedas provides information about the civilisation of the Early Vedic Age?
(1) Rig-veda (2) Yajur-veda
(3) Atharva-veda (4) Sama-veda

6. The university which became famous in the post-Gupta Era was :
(1) Kanchi (2) Taxila
(3) Nalanda (4) Vallabhi

7. Banabhatta was the court poet
of which emperor ?
(1) Vikramaditya
(2) Kumaragupta
(3) Harshavardhana
(4) Kanishka

8. The first Indian ruler, who established the supremacy of Indian
Navy in the Arabian Sea was :
(1) Rajaraja I (2) Rajendra I
(3) Rajadhiraja I (4) Kulottunga I

9. Which statement on the Harappan Civilisation is correct?
(1) Horse sacrifice was known
to them.
(2) Cow was sacred to them.
(3) ‘Pashupati’ was venerated by
them.
(4) The culture was not generally
static.

10. The First Tirthankara of the
Jains was :
(1) Arishtanemi (2) Parshvanath
(3) Ajitanath (4) Rishabha

Answers: 1. (*) 2.(4) 3.(4) 4.(1)
5.(1) 6.(3) 7.(3) 8.(1)
9.(4) 10.(4)

1. (*) Samvat is any of the various Hindu calendars. In
India, there are several calendars in use. The Saka
Samvat is associated with 78 A.D; Gupta Samvat with
320 A.D; and Hijri Samvat with 622 A.D. The first
year of Hijri era was the Islamic year beginning in AD
622 during which the emigration of Muhammad from
Mecca to Medina, known as the Hijra, occurred. The
Gregorian calendar, also called the Western calendar
and the Christian calendar, is the internationally accepted civil calendar. It was introduced by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom the calendar was named, by a
decree signed on 24 February, 1582.

2. (4) The name ‘Mithila‘ goes back to Puranic times. It
occurs in the Mahabharata and in Pali literature. According to the Puranic tradition the name has been
derived from that of Mithi (son of Nimi) King of Ayodhya and grandson of Manu who founded a kingdom which was called Mithila after him. It is associated with Valmiki, Ashtavakra, Yajnavalkya, Udayana,
Mahavira, Kanada, Jaimini and Kapila as well as the
women philosophers, such as, Gargi, Maitreyi, Bharati and Katyayani. After the era of the Ramayana it is
said that the three seats of culture in Vedic period –
Kosala, Kasi and Videha – merged to form the Vajjians
confederacy and the centre of political gravity shifted
from Mithila to Vaishali.

3. (4) Ujjain (Avanti, Avantikapuri), is an ancient city of
Malwa region in central India, on the eastern bank of
the Kshipra River, today part of the state of Madhya
Pradesh. Avanti with its capital at Ujjaini, is mentioned in Buddhist literature as one of the four great
powers along with Vatsa, Kosala and Magadha.

4. (1) The archaeological record of the Indus civilization
provides practically no evidence of armies, kings,
slaves, social conflict, prisons, and other oft-negative
traits that we traditionally associated with early civilizations. If there were neither slaves nor kings, a more
egalitarian system of governance may have been practiced. Besides, compared to other ancient civilizations
the houses were of nearly equal size indicating a more
egalitarian social structure i.e. The Social System of
the Harappans was fairly egalitarian.

5. (1) The Vedic period (or Vedic age) was a period in
history during which the Vedas, the oldest scriptures
of Hinduism, were composed. The time span of the
period is uncertain. Philological and linguistic evidence
indicates that the Rig Veda, the oldest of the Vedas,
was composed roughly between 1700 and 1100 BCE,
also referred to as the early Vedic period. It is an
important source of information on the Vedic religion
and their Gods as well as presents a detailed account
of the life of the people at that time.

6. (3) Nalanda was an ancient centre of higher learning
in Bihar, which was a Buddhist centre of learning
from the fifth or sixth century A.D. to 1197 CE. Nalanda flourished between the reign of the Sakraditya
(whose identity is uncertain and who might have been
either Kumara Gupta I or Kumara Gupta II) and 1197
A.D, supported by patronage from the Hindu Gupta
rulers as well as Buddhist emperors like Harsha and
later emperors from the Pala Empire.

7. (3) Banabhatta was a Sanskrit scholar and poet of
India. He was the Asthana Kavi in the court of King
Harshavardhana, who reigned in the years 606–647
CE in north India. Bana’s principal works include a
biography of Harsha, the Harshacharita and one of
the world’s earliest novels, Kadambari. The other works
attributed to him is the Parvatiparinaya.

8. (1) Rajaraja Chola I created a powerful standing army
and a considerable navy, which achieved even greater success under his son Rajendra Chola I. One of
the last conquests of Rajaraja was the naval conquest
of the ‘old islands of the sea numbering 12,000’, the
Maldives. Chola Navy also had played a major role in
the invasion of Lanka.

9. (4) Potteries of the Harappan Civilization bring out the
gradual evolutionary trend in the culture. It is on the
basis of different types of potteries and ceramic art
from found over the different stages of the civilization, it can be said that Harappan culture was not
static and did not disappear suddenly. While showing signs of decay, in course of time it rejuvenated
itself by reviving some of the earlier ceramic traditions and evolving new ones in the transitional phase.

10. (4) In Jainism, Rishabh was the first of the 24
Tirthankaras who founded the Ikshavaku dynasty and
was the first Tirthankara of the present age. Because
of this, he was called Adinath. He is mentioned in the
Hindu text of the Bhagavata Purana as an avatar of
Vishnu. In Jainism, a Tirthankara is a human being
who helps in achieving liberation and enlightenment
as an “Arihant” by destroying all of their soul constraining (ghati) karmas, became a role-model and
leader for those seeking spiritual guidance.

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IBPS RRB PO & CLERK// TIME & WORK // QUESTIONS

1)Some staff promised to do a job in 18 days, but 6 of them went on leave. So, the remaining men took 20 days to complete the job. How many men were there originally?

(a) 55 (b) 62 (c) 56 (d) 60 (e) None of these

 

2) A and B together can complete a work in 3 days. They start together but after 2 days, B left the work. If the work is completed after two more days, B alone would do the work in

(a) 5 days (b) 6 days (c) 9 days (d) 10 days (e) None of these

 

3) A is 50% as efficient as B. C does half of the work done by A and B together in same time in same time. If C alone does the work in 20 days, then A, B and C together can do work in:

(a)5 2/3 days (b)6 2/3 days  (c) 6 days (d) 7 days (e) None of these

 

4) A team of 30 men is supposed to do a work in 38 days. After 25 days, 5 more men were employed and the work was finished one day earlier. How many days would it have been delayed if 5 more men were not employed?

(a) 1 day (b) 2 days (c) 3 days (d) 4 days (e) None of these

 

5) 5 men or 7 women can earn Rs. 5,250 per day, how much would 7 men and 13 women earn per day?

(a)11,600 (b) Rs. 11,700 (c) Rs. 16,100 (d) Rs. 17,100 (e) None of these

 

6) 40 men can complete a work in 40 days. They started the work together. But at the end of each 10th day, 5 men left the job. The work would have been completed in

(a)56 2 days 3 (b)56 1 days 3 (c) 52 days (d) 50 days (e) None of these

7) 3 women and 18 children together take 2 days to complete a piece of work. How many days will 9 children alone take to complete the piece of work, if 6 women alone can complete the piece of work in 3 days?

(a) 9 (b) 7 (c) 5 (d) 6 (e) None of these

8) A can do a piece of work in 120 days and B can do it in 150 days. They work together for 20 days. Then B leaves and A alone continues the work. After C joins A and the work is completed in 48 days more. In how many days can C do it if he works alone?

(a) 230 days (b) 225 days (c) 240 days (d) 220 days (e) None of these

9) 2 men and 1 woman can do a piece of work in 14 days, while 4 women and 2 men can do the same work in 8 days. If a man gets Rs. 90 per day, what should be the wages per day of a women?

(a) Rs. 48 (b) Rs. 60 (c) Rs. 72 (d) Rs. 135 (e) None of these

 10) Heena can do a work in 20 days, while Himani can do the same work in 25 days. They started the work jointly. Few days later Mayuri also joined them and thus all of them completed the whole work in 10 days. All of them were paid total Rs. 700. What is the share of Mayuri?

(a) Rs. 130 (b) Rs. 185 (c) Rs. 70 (d) Rs. 80 (e) None of these

Answers:

1 d

2. B

3. B

4 A

5 D

6A

7 D

8 C

9B

10 C